If you’ve been skiing for a while, you probably have some dreams for what kind of skiing or ski situations are ideal. And if you’re super serious about those dreams, you’ve probably made a skiing bucket list, even if it’s just in your head.

If you’re an avid reader of our blog, you may have seen my previous post on “12 Things from My Skiing Bucket List“. I’ll be honest, I was a little younger back then, and maybe a little wilder. Although I haven’t knocked many items off the list, I have updated my onsie ski suit, and it’s pretty close to perfect.

But now that I’m a little older, and maybe a bit wiser, I have added a few items to my skiing bucket list. That’s not to say they’re all very official and adult like, but I would highly recommend at least a few of them.

Ski some Japow

Japan may not be the first place you think of when it comes to skiing. However, recently Japan has been getting a lot of press for their less crowded and off the beaten path ski resorts. Oh, I almost forgot, if you haven’t heard the term before Japow is just skiing Japanese powder.

And rumor has it, powder in Japan just skis differently, so naturally I need to try it. The experience as a whole is just supposed to be very different, and I have a trip to Niseko planned in my head on the horizon.

Earn your turns

Sometimes this concept can feel a bit snobbish to me. Earn your turns means that you have to hike up whatever you’re about to ski down. But there is a certain piece of homage in this concept, and in understanding the roots of skiing and where it came from.

It’s easy to forget about a time before chairlifts, or gondolas, or even rope tows. Yet that’s exactly where skiing started, some crazy person climbing step by step up a mountain and sliding back down on skis. And even beyond the homage piece, sometimes earning your turns is the best way to get first tracks and fresh pow. So at least once in this life, I want to hike up a sick line and earn every turn on the way back down.

4th of July skiing

If this concept is new to you, it might sound outlandish. But there are a number of places that offer 4th of July skiing, when the conditions will allow (which isn’t terribly often). But if you’re lucky enough to hit the right season, snowfall, placement, and timing, you can experience one of the most fun skiing events of the year. I mean it’s basically just a big party with lots of bikini tops, sunglasses, goggle tans, and pond skims. Generally, there’s only one or two runs open with a single lift, but that’s all you need to for this booze filled end to a great season.

Sound like a great time? Check out these resorts and see if they’re offering the rare 4th of July skiing this year: A-basin in Colorado, Copper Mountain in Colorado, Squaw Valley in California, Mammoth in California, Mt. Bachelor in Oregon, Timberline Lodge in Oregon, Beartooth Basin in Wyoming/Montana, and Whistler in B.C. Canada.

Poach a hot tub

There is honestly nothing better after a long day of skiing than kicking back and relaxing in a hot tub. That feeling of warm water surrounding your aching muscles and chilled bones absolutely cannot be beat. Crack open a cold one by the edge of the tub and hang out with some friends, then tell me this isn’t the perfect way to apres ski.

Unfortunately, not every ski trip has a perfectly accessible hot tub available for such relaxation. Or do they? Hot tub poaching is sneaking in to some one (or some resorts) hot tub without them noticing. This can be either super difficult, or very easy depending on where you are, and where the hot tub is located.

My suggestion (slash plan of attack) is to shoot for an outdoor tub at a busy hotel or resort, where a couple of randoms slipping into the tub may go unnoticed. For a full rundown of how to really poach a hot tub, check out the video below.

Ski the iconic runs

There are so many ski runs in the world, it can seem like a daunting task to try to take them all on. For me, as I mentioned in my last blog about my skiing bucket list, skiing at one place in every continent is good enough. But there are some ski runs that are just better than others, as we probably all have experienced.

So what about those top runs? The ones that are considered the best, most dangerous, most beautiful, and so on? Well, for most, these are considered the iconic runs, and it is my ambition to knock at least a few of them off the list. There is definitely some debate on what constitutes an iconic run, but here I’m just going to list a few that pop up on most people’s radar.

  • Single Chair line at Mad River Glen, Vermont
  • Kill the Banker at Revelstoke, BC
  • Hidden Gully at Bridger Bowl, Montana
  • Corbet’s Couloir at Jackson Hole, Wyoming
  • The Wall in Portes du Soleil, France / Switzerland
  • Vallee Blanche in Chamonix
  • Pipeline at Snowbird, Utah
  • Gunbarrel at Heavenly Mountain Resort, California

World Ski and Snowboard Festival in Whistler

This last one is where a little of my wild comes back out, as the World Ski and Snowboard Festival in Whistler is the party of the year. It’s a 5-day festival dedicated to snow sports, art, music, culture, and the outdoors.

Honestly, what could be better? It’s the largest annual winter sports festival there is, and it is everything that’s good in this world. This year, it will be taking place from April 10th through April 15th in Whistler, with a full schedule of winter sport competitions, music series, and art exhibitions. Want to see the full line up and just what it has to offer? Click here, and get your tickets for the must experience item on this bucket list.

A skiing bucket list is a great thing to have, if only to help you get excited for each coming ski season. So start your own, or if you already have one, share what you’ve got with us. What’s on your skiing bucket list?